The Best Japanese Maple Bonsais To Buy Online

japanese maple bonsais

When you look at any of the best Japanese Maple bonsais to buy online, the first aspect you’ll notice is how stunning the leaves look. This species is wildly popular in tropical climates, and we don’t blame you for wanting one. We’ll recommend a few, while also showing you how to select the right one for you.

Here’s a short overview of the topics:

Here’s a short overview of the topics:

Top Three Japanese Maple Bonsais

74 Year Old Weeping Japanese Maple Specimen Bonsai Tree

26 Year Old Japanese Maple Root Over Rock Specimen Bonsai Tree

46 Year Old Rhode Island Red Japanese Maple Bonsai Tree

74 Year Old Weeping Japanese Maple Specimen Bonsai Tree

  • Editor's choice

26 Year Old Japanese Maple Root Over Rock Specimen Bonsai Tree

  • Editor's choice

46 Year Old Rhode Island Red Japanese Maple Bonsai Tree

  • Editor's choice

Reviews Of The Best Japanese Maple Bonsais

We’ll begin by showing you our selection of the best Japanese Maple bonsais you can buy online. Remember, these are only our recommendations based on our personal criteria developed within Bonsai Alchemist. You’ll need to assess them with your own eyes to see if any of them suit you.

74 Year Old Weeping Japanese Maple Specimen Bonsai Tree

  • Age: 74 years
  • Style: Informal upright
  • Hardiness zone: 5 - 8
  • Dimensions: 41" x 48" x 40"
  • Weight: Not indicated

Review of the Unique Qualities

Age is a factor that makes any bonsai priceless. The older it is, the better it can withstand poor conditions and the more value it has. That’s why we’re recommending this 74-year old as one of the best Japanese Maple bonsais, while there are a few other factors too.

For instance, it has a stunning canopy with foliage suspended above the single trunk. There’s a round bonsai pot that’s ideal for the tree, providing support for the roots. What makes the bonsai’s age an excellent choice is that you don’t have to repot it as often as younger ones.

Pros

Cons

Summary

When it comes to Japanese Maple bonsais, this one is the cream of the crop. You’ll be able to showcase it in the center of any room to steal the attention of the observers.

It doesn’t matter how much it costs, as a product like this is priceless. You’ll just need to ensure that the seller uses secure delivery so that it doesn’t receive any damage.

26 Year Old Japanese Maple Root Over Rock Specimen Bonsai Tree

  • Age: 26 years
  • Style: Root-over-rock
  • Hardiness zone: 5 - 8
  • Dimensions: 18 x 19 x 16 inches
  • Weight: Not indicated

Review of the Unique Qualities

Here’s another old tree that stretches into 26 years, making it one of the Japanese Maple bonsais worth considering. As there’s only one available, there’s limited stock available, and you’ll need to make your decision quickly before it’s gone. You’ll be the only person who has this stunning specimen in your home since there are none like it.

The seller has done an excellent job of training the bonsai tree to grow over a massive rock. The roots are displayed beautifully, while there’s a slight slant to the stem. Your home will be the envy of the town if you allow anyone near it when they come to visit.

Pros

Cons

Summary

Not all Japanese Maple bonsais need to be small and cheap. As you can see with this product, there’s enough value to justify the cost. The tender age and strong trunk are incredible, and you’ll love observing the roots formed over the single rock.

Of course, you’ll need to be careful when you repot it for new soil, but at least you won’t have to worry about that for several years.

46 Year Old Rhode Island Red Japanese Maple Bonsai Tree

  • Age: 46 years
  • Style: Formal upright/exposed root
  • Hardiness zone: 5 - 8
  • Dimensions: 22 x 24 x 29 inches
  • Weight: Not indicated

Review of the Unique Qualities

Here’s one of the Japanese Maple bonsais that falls into a class of its own. While there are limited numbers available, it also makes it unique from other trees in its species. It’s also very old, which increases its value to prospective buyers.

We love the exposed roots at the base, which gives it that elegant touch. It might not show too much of the roots, but it’s enough to add class to the bonsai tree. The foliage has stunning colors, presented in formal upright broom style. The seller also provides an oval container to keep everything in place.

Pros

Cons

Summary

The red and green mixture is beautiful when found on Japanese Maple bonsais, but you’ll love the dense foliage that puts on a show. The age is visible in the thick trunk, giving you the security that it’ll endure for decades more. You’ll have to grab it while you can, as there’s only one available.

43 Year Old Rhode Island Red Japanese Maple Bonsai Tree

  • Age: 43 years
  • Style: Formal upright/exposed root
  • Hardiness zone: 5 - 8
  • Dimensions: 18 x 21 x 27 inches
  • Weight: Not indicated

Review of the Unique Qualities

We found another one of the top Rhode Island Red Japanese Maple bonsais, featuring an age of 43 years. There’s an exposed root system that was designed incredibly well. The leaves are densely packed, and you’ll love running your fingers through them.

The leaf color is pale green or red, depending on the season and how well you look after it. There’s a rectangular container with enough space for the roots to grow. However, it’s another product where there’s only one available, so you’ll need to purchase it while it’s available.

Pros

Cons

Summary

This Japanese Maple bonsai is a treasure to behold, with a firm trunk, exposed roots, and dense foliage. You’ll enjoy watching the colors change over the various seasons, and you won’t need to change the soil that often.

However, ensure that you watch for any pests or diseases that may attack it. You’ll also need to see how it adjusts to moving to a new location and watch for any falling leaves.

40 Year Old Rhode Island Red Japanese Maple Bonsai Tree

  • Age: 40 years
  • Style: Formal upright/exposed roots
  • Hardiness zone: 5 - 8 years
  • Dimensions: 20 x 21 x 27 inches
  • Weight: Not indicated

Review of the Unique Qualities

At the end of the line of the Rhode Island Red Japanese Maple bonsais is this 40-year-old tree. There’s a massive container to hold the bulk of the weight, so you can imagine how large the roots must be. Speaking of which, it has an exposed design so you can view the structure without being intrusive.

The foliage is as tall as it is wide, giving you plenty of foliage to observe or prune if you wish. We recommend keeping the style as it is, as it looks absolutely gorgeous. However, you may want to cut back if you see vigorous growth that’s out of control.

Pros

Cons

Summary

This Japanese Maple bonsai comes across as an exotic tree, showing off its best through all the seasons. It’s your choice if you want to prune the dense foliage or keep it as it is, while you can also replace the soil and container. Remember to feed it enough fertilizer, as it’s old and has a heavy structure.

Dwarf Kamagata Japanese Maple Live Plant

  • Age: Not indicated
  • Style: Formal upright
  • Hardiness zone: 5
  • Dimensions: 4 ft high
  • Weight: Not indicated

Review of the Unique Qualities

The Dwarf Kamagata is one of the best Japanese Maple bonsais to place in your home. It shows off its red-pointed leaves, and you’ll love how strong the trunk is. Of course, you can expect it to change colors with the seasons, presenting its beauty for all to behold.

Unfortunately, the seller doesn’t provide much information about the bonsai tree, except indicating the height. You might receive a grafted sapling instead of a mature tree, but that makes it easier to shape as it grows. It’s best that you monitor it for the first year carefully to ensure it develops well.

Pros

Cons

Summary

While you won’t receive a full-grown Japanese Maple bonsai, there’s space to play around with ideas and develop your own style. You’ll need to shop around for containers and any other accessories you want, such as deco stones or figurines.

Our only concern is watching the tree over the first year. If you’re determined to buy from this seller, we suggest obtaining one at the end of winter so you can see if new buds appear on the trunk. In that way, you know you have a healthy bonsai.

Japanese Zen Garden with Red Maple Bonsai Tree Set

  • Age: N/A
  • Style: Informal upright
  • Hardiness zone: N/A
  • Dimensions: 11 x 4 x 12 inches
  • Weight: 2.86 lbs

Review of the Unique Qualities

At first glance, you’d think this is a real Japanese Maple bonsai. If you zoom in and look closely, you’ll notice the artificial attachments that secure the leaves to the branches. While it may not be an actual, life tree, we still feel it’s worth mentioning on our list for a few reasons.

Firstly, it looks amazing, and you’ll get the same calm feeling with it in your room. You won’t need to water or maintain it, neither do you have to worry about fertilizer. Of course, any bonsai enthusiast will tell you that’s half the fun. Still, it’s a good present for someone who doesn’t want to look after a tree and only wants one for appearances.

Pros

Cons

Summary

We know you’d probably prefer only real trees in our list, but we felt it was worth adding to our best Japanese Maple bonsais. There are many people only looking for gift ideas, and this item is more than suitable for someone that knows nothing about maintaining trees.

Murasaki Kiyohime Japanese Maple 2 - Year Live Plant

  • Age: 2 years
  • Style: Your choice
  • Hardiness zone: 5 - 8
  • Dimensions: Varies
  • Weight: Varies

Review of the Unique Qualities

This seller appears to have a range of Japanese Maple bonsais available. The small tree you purchase has been grown from one of these in their collection, so there’s no telling what size you’ll receive upon delivery. For the most part, they are small saplings that you can style as you wish as they grow older.

When you receive the Japanese Maple sapling, you’ll need to have a container at the ready. Still, it has gorgeous leaves that are sure to put on a show in autumn. We love that you’ll be able to mold the bonsai as it grows, integrating your personality and energy into it.

Pros

Cons

Summary

The uncertainty of what you’ll receive is always a massive concern. From what we’ve seen, the sapling takes well and you should be able to develop it into a large tree within a few years.

Of course, you’ll need to take extra special care of it, especially over winter. These are the most delicate months, and you’ll need to protect it from frost.

Brighter Blooms - Bloodgood Japanese Maple Tree

  • Age: 2 - 3 years
  • Style: Formal upright
  • Hardiness zone: 5
  • Dimensions: 5 ft high
  • Weight: Varies

Review of the Unique Qualities

You might not want to wait for a sapling to reach the full height you desire after a few years. Some bonsai enthusiasts grow trees in pots or the garden and then move them into a ceramic container. You’ll need expert skills to prune it back to the size you want, but at least you’ll have a thick trunk in no time.

We love how deep red the leaves are, so you’ll want to get your hands on a Bloodgood Japanese Maple. Don’t let the height or weight put you off, but make sure you obtain one just before the repotting season. You’ll want to protect the roots from damage before new shoots appear.

Pros

Cons

Summary

If you want, you can ask the seller for a specific size and see if it’s available. You’ll love the freedom you’ll have to craft your own style, but make sure you don’t damage it in the process. You can also try grafting the cuttings to create more bonsais.

Bloodgood Japanese Maple - (3-4ft) Live Plant

  • Age: 1 - 3 years
  • Style: Formal upright
  • Hardiness zone: 7 - 10
  • Dimensions: 12 x 12 x 55 inches
  • Weight: 11 lbs

Review of the Unique Qualities

Here’s another Bloodgood Japanese Maple you can either prune back to a bonsai or grow as a large magnificent one in your home. You only need to prune down the tops until you have the size you want. You can also enquire as to which sizes are available to see if you have the option to choose.

Of course, you won’t receive any containers since it’s sold as a tree that would usually go in your yard. That doesn’t matter, as you can buy one that would go well with the Japanese Maple, and you can shape it as you please. What makes the tree ideal is that you’ll have a thick trunk already available.

Pros

Cons

Summary

We’ll all for buying large Maple trees for that stunning girth and rich foliage. As always, you should prune and pot it in a bonsai container when it’s the correct season for it. You don’t want to accidentally kill it and then ask for a replacement.

What Makes Japanese Maple Bonsais so Popular?

No matter where you look online, you’ll notice that these attractive bonsai trees are incredibly popular. While some of the reasons indicated below are obvious, there are others we wanted to mention. We bet you’ll love them for the same reasons.

Beautiful Foliage

The most striking feature is the dense, massive foliage. Sure, you can thin it out if you want, but we actually love when the leaves bunch together. It presents a fantastic canopy, protecting the soil and trunk from the burning sun.

What really draws attention is the changing colors over the various seasons. While you’ll have stunning green in spring and summer, you can expect red and orange in autumn and winter. Of course, it all depends on which variant you’re growing, as there are other hues available.

Gorgeous Structure

When it hits the heart of winter, the leaves will fall and you’ll witness the magnificent structure of the stems and branches. If you’re pruned properly, it will be an excellent display of nettings and close-knit twigs. While the leaves are beautiful, the absence of them is another wonder to behold.

Half the joy is in the experience of developing the structure over the years. You’ll need a detailed plan for how you’ll achieve your desired goal, but don’t be afraid to look for inspiration or guidance. In the end, you won’t regret how much time you put in towards crafting your precious Japanese Maple bonsai.

Easy To Maintain

One of the top reasons people find this species so popular is for how easy it is to maintain. It’s one of the best choices for beginners, as you can make a few mistakes along the way and get away with it. However, that doesn’t mean you can neglect to care for it since it still requires adequate water, sunlight, humidity, and food.

The Japanese Maple bonsai is also ideal for growing indoors. It prefers shaded sunlight to direct, as the rays tend to burn the delicate leaves. Coupled with its distaste for frost, placing it inside your home is the best way to show it your love.

Thick Trunk

A thick trunk on the right species looks stunning, and it’s certainly the case for this bonsai. If you look at really old Japanese Maples, you’ll see how much girth the stem has, especially if it was developed correctly. We specifically love the trees with a wide root base, thinning out towards the center and then spreading out with foliage and branches.

While it may take decades to get the right thickness, you can all use a few techniques for trunk thickening. We’ll cover these in our Learning Center, but we wanted to mention how well this method works with the species. It may only take you a few years to achieve a decent girth, but you can pretend to your friends that it’s hundreds of years old.

Outstanding Showpiece

Finally, all of the above reasons reveal the top reason why people love Japanese Maple bonsais so much. It’s an outstanding feature for your showroom, and we’re sure it’ll take center stage. If you attend any of the bonsai tree festivals worldwide, we have no doubt you’ll spy this species among them.

japanese maple bonsais

Japanese Maple Variants

You may have noticed from our reviews that there isn’t merely one type of Japanese Maple. There are so many variants, it’s challenging to contain them all in one article.

We’ll quickly highlight the top 15 Japanese Maple bonsai variants and their features:

  • Laceleaf: Feathery, red leaves that become crimson in autumn with weeping branches
  • Coonara Pygmy: Pinkish leaves in spring, green in summer, and orange in autumn, with the tree remaining small in size
  • Green Cascade: Green leaves that turn red in autumn, you’ll end up with a mound if you don’t stake the branches
  • Golden Full Moon: Yellow leaves with red edges, this Japanese Maple is one of the prized variants as bonsais
  • Autumn Moon: Yellow leaves with pink tones, while autumn reveals shades of orange and red for a spectacular show
  • Hogyoku:Tolerates heat incredibly well, while showcasing green leaves that change to orange in autumn
  • Beni Kawa: Tiny green leaves that become golden-yellow with red stems, you’ll love the contrast when snow falls on it
  • Higasayama: Pink buds that become green or cream leaves, you’ll see yellow or gold as the seasons change
  • Emperor I: Dark purple-red leaves that appear a bit later than other variants, while changing to scarlet-red in autumn
  • Coral Bark: Also known as Sango-kaku, the bark’s color is the main attraction when the green leaves fall in winter
  • Suminagashi: While the leaves start as purple-red in spring, it becomes its trademark bright crimson later in the year
  • Bloodgood: One of the most popular variants, the leaves are purple-red and transform into crimson red
  • Villa Taranto: The spider leaves are pink in spring, green in summer, and golden yellow in summer
  • Crimson Queen: Weeping branches with purple-red leaves that transform into crimson
  • Beni Schichihenge: Tiny tree that’s ideal for bonsais, with blue-green leaves that variegate into cream and pink, and are resistant to leaf scorch

What Sets These Japanese Maple Bonsais Apart From Others

Choosing the best Japanese maple bonsais can be challenging. Before we show you what criteria we used, we’ll focus on what makes these products stand out from the others. We hope it will give you a keen eye the next time you do online shopping.

Healthy Shape

Some sellers just take a cutting and place it in soil. We look for the ones who go the extra mile. Do they make the extra effort to keep it in shape, and can you see the trunk and branch structure under the dense foliage?

Appearance

We love Japanese Maple bonsais that look strong, healthy, and well-maintained. Of course, we expect the leaves to put on a show. We won’t lie; we tend to aim for beauty when it comes to this tree above everything else. Those that are more appealing to the eyes stand out among the rest.

Containers and Soil

The pot and soil mean a lot to us. While we appreciate that some sellers use plastic trainer containers, we prefer genuine ceramic bonsai pots. Of course, you’ll probably need to replace the soil at some point, but it needs to be healthy and not smell bad.

How We Picked Our Top Selection

Now it’s time to see how we chose the best Japanese maple bonsais. Yes, the above aspects played a part, but we also looked at the following elements. We might forgive some sellers for not paying attention to these, but we prefer if they’re included.

Tools and Accessories

Not everyone has the tools to maintain their Japanese Maple bonsais properly. There are also other accessories that’ll be helpful, such as fertilizer, a care guide, and extra soil. We’re even seen some with figurines, which is not necessary but defines the brand’s quality.

Local Trees

If the bonsai tree is grown locally, it has a better chance at survival when moved to your home. Purchasing Japanese Maple bonsais from overseas not only costs more, but it’ll have to adapt to the new climate. Save yourself the money and the tree stress and buy from local providers.

Value

Don’t be fooled into buying a cheap bonsai. We know it may be more affordable, but the quality may be bad. There’s more value in spending a bit more on an older tree that’s able to withstand harsh conditions better.

Customer Comments

We might like a Japanese Maple bonsai we received, but that doesn’t mean other clients had the same experience. We take note of any complaints about damaged trees and take an average among the feedback. If we see many customers having the same pleasant experience as us, the tree’s going onto our list.

japanese maple bonsais

What Factors to Consider When Buying Your First Japanese Maple Bonsai

You’ll also need to do some homework when buying products online. While we recommend the best Japanese Maple bonsais according to our criteria, you also have some aspects to look at before bringing them home. Here’s what you need to consider.

Size

Not everyone has room for the majestic Japanese Maple in their apartments or homes. If you really want to put on a show, you should have large, dense foliage. Check the product’s dimensions first and ensure you have adequate space where you want to place it. There shouldn’t be any objects or other bonsais preventing further growth.

Age

Older, mature Japanese Maple bonsais look spectacular, especially when the leaves put on a stunning show. While you can settle for a younger one, it may be more challenging to cultivate and maintain. The sellers usually have experience in keeping them for as long as possible, but you’ll pay more for greater age.

Climate

We generally indicate the hardiness zone for a Japanese Maple bonsai for a reason. The species tends to grow better in those climates. You might be able to get away with a region that’s similar, but we don’t recommend moving it from one zone to another that has an extreme climate the tree isn’t used to.

Placement

Location in your home is vital to the bonsai tree’s survival. You’ll want to make sure it receives sufficient light, shade, and humidity while not moving it around too much. After reading our care sheet, have a look around your home to determine where it will be best for its requirements.

Risks

Once you’ve determined the proposed location, take a look around. Do you see anything that can be a potential risk to your bonsai tree? Are there any cats that might knock it over when trying to get to the window, or do you have a small dog that may try to eat the branches?

Final Thoughts

A Japanese Maple will be welcome in any bonsai collection, especially if it has stunning leaves. Our massive article strives to ensure that you make a decision that suits you and your home. Before you buy any of the above-listed bonsais, ensure that you read every detail we’ve provided so you don’t end up dissatisfied.

japanese maple bonsais

FAQ About the Best Japanese Maple Bonsais

Before you exit Bonsai Alchemist, we have a few questions we found online that you may be interested in. We did our best to answer these as concisely as possible. However, you can also email us if you have any other queries about Japanese Maple bonsais.

Yes, there are several Maple species that you can use as a bonsai. These trees have stunning leaves and trunks that make them prized as bonsai trees. They can be challenging to grow, which is why experts love them so much.

The Japanese Maple is one of the favorites to transform into a bonsai tree. Many countries worldwide will pay high prices to own these, especially if they are old. You’ll see some of the best displays at events and conventions, where the owners do their best to show off the brilliant foliage.

Japanese Maples aren’t fond of complete defoliation, so try to keep as many leaves as possible. In winter, you can do structural pruning, while late spring is better for fine pruning if you want to thin out the foliage.

Yes, these bonsai trees are ideal for back-budding if you want to cut back to the bud. However, don’t attempt to do this to too many branches at the same time, as it may harm its development. A bit per season will work well, and you can do more as it grows older.

Younglings need regular watering during the warmer months and fewer quantities in winter. As the Japanese Maples grow older, they can withstand drought better, but you should still check the soil to see how thirsty they are.

The archenemy of this species is the Japanese beetle. Since they enjoy the leaves so much, it can annihilate the appearance of the foliage, which is the most beautiful factor. They prefer younger trees, but they’ll also aim for older ones if that’s all that’s available in the area.

You’ll see the new shoots and leaves in spring, while they show their full potential during summer. As autumn arrives, you’ll notice the colors change, and a few leaves may drop as winter approaches. When the Japanese Maple drops all its leaves, you can witness the beautiful structure of the trunks and branches.

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